jopeg

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 1489
Caros,

In TVI24:
Citação

Avião desaparecido: satélite chinês pode ter descoberto destroços

As imagens foram captadas no estreito de Malaca, para onde o avião se pode ter desviado

Por: Redacção / EC    |   2014-03-12 21:36

Satélite chinês deteta local suspeito onde pode ter caído o voo MH370 (foto CNN) Satélite chinês deteta local suspeito onde pode ter caído o voo MH370 (foto CNN) Satélite chinês deteta local suspeito onde pode ter caído o voo MH370 (foto CNN) Vietname divulga imagem com alegados destroços do avião desaparecido

Um satélite chinês «observou uma área suspeita de acidente no mar», enquanto procurava pelo avião da Malaysia Airlines, desaparecido há cinco dias.

Segundo avançou a CNN, a administração chinesa estatal da ciência, tecnologia e indústria para a defesa nacional anunciou a descoberta de «três objetos suspeitos a flutuar, e os seus tamanhos».

As imagens foram captadas no estreito de Malaca, para onde o avião se pode ter desviado, no dia 9, o dia seguinte ao desaparecimento, mas só esta quarta-feira foram divulgadas.

Ainda hoje, oficiais responsáveis pela investigação haviam anunciado que a área de buscas tinha sido alargada novamente, e neste momento já cobre cerca de 27 mil milhas náuticas, mais do dobro da área de ontem.

Esta nova expansão revela a falta de pistas encontradas pelas autoridades da Malásia, o que já causou o abandono da investigação por parte do Vietname, até que as autoridades consigam encontrar mais informações sobre a possível localização da aeronave.

Segundo o vice-primeiro-ministro dos transportes, Phan Quy Tieu, as informações providenciadas pelas autoridades da Malásia são «insuficientes». «Até agora só tivemos uma reunião com os representantes das forças militares malaias».

O voo 370 que fazia a ligação entre Kuala Lumpur e Pequim desapareceu na madrugada de sábado com 239 pessoas a bordo e até agora não existem quaisquer informações do que possa ter acontecido.


Jopeg

david1990

  • Mensagens: 786
  • Airbus A320 - Boeing 777 - Boeing 747
Caros,

In TVI24:
Citação

Avião desaparecido: satélite chinês pode ter descoberto destroços

As imagens foram captadas no estreito de Malaca, para onde o avião se pode ter desviado

Por: Redacção / EC    |   2014-03-12 21:36

Satélite chinês deteta local suspeito onde pode ter caído o voo MH370 (foto CNN) Satélite chinês deteta local suspeito onde pode ter caído o voo MH370 (foto CNN) Satélite chinês deteta local suspeito onde pode ter caído o voo MH370 (foto CNN) Vietname divulga imagem com alegados destroços do avião desaparecido

Um satélite chinês «observou uma área suspeita de acidente no mar», enquanto procurava pelo avião da Malaysia Airlines, desaparecido há cinco dias.

Segundo avançou a CNN, a administração chinesa estatal da ciência, tecnologia e indústria para a defesa nacional anunciou a descoberta de «três objetos suspeitos a flutuar, e os seus tamanhos».

As imagens foram captadas no estreito de Malaca, para onde o avião se pode ter desviado, no dia 9, o dia seguinte ao desaparecimento, mas só esta quarta-feira foram divulgadas.

Ainda hoje, oficiais responsáveis pela investigação haviam anunciado que a área de buscas tinha sido alargada novamente, e neste momento já cobre cerca de 27 mil milhas náuticas, mais do dobro da área de ontem.

Esta nova expansão revela a falta de pistas encontradas pelas autoridades da Malásia, o que já causou o abandono da investigação por parte do Vietname, até que as autoridades consigam encontrar mais informações sobre a possível localização da aeronave.

Segundo o vice-primeiro-ministro dos transportes, Phan Quy Tieu, as informações providenciadas pelas autoridades da Malásia são «insuficientes». «Até agora só tivemos uma reunião com os representantes das forças militares malaias».

O voo 370 que fazia a ligação entre Kuala Lumpur e Pequim desapareceu na madrugada de sábado com 239 pessoas a bordo e até agora não existem quaisquer informações do que possa ter acontecido.


Jopeg
Infelizmente não pertencem ao MH370, nem sequer encontraram algo.

GCA

  • Mensagens: 10
Citação
Malaysian officials deny claims that missing flight MH370 flew on for hours

Airline chief says Rolls-Royce and Boeing have said they did not receive data from plane after 1.07am on night of disappearance
Kate Hodal in Songkhla and Tania Branigan in Beijing

Malaysian authorities have discredited as "inaccurate" reports that the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 may have flown for an additional four hours beyond its last sighting, claiming that the final information received from its engines indicated everything was operating normally.

Sources described as familiar with the details of the missing Boeing 777's data had told the Wall Street Journal that US investigators believed the plane had flown for a total of five hours, indicating that the plane may have been diverted "with the intention of using it later for another purpose".

The theory was based on data downloaded in real time and "sent to the ground" straight from the Boeing's engines, which are manufactured by the British company Rolls-Royce.

"We have contacted both the possible sources of data – Rolls-Royce and Boeing – and both have said they did not receive data beyond 1.07am," the Malaysia Airlines chief executive, Ahmad Jauhari Yahyain, told reporters on Thursday afternoon. "The last transmission at 1.07am stated that everything was operating normally."
The data-retrieval system is said to be standard procedure for maintaining and monitoring the engines and is loaded with information regarding the jet's performance, altitude and speed, which is then "compiled and transmitted in 30-minute increments", according to the Wall Street Journal.

A New Scientist report on the Boeing engine data-retrieval system also indicated that Rolls-Royce received two data summaries from MH370 — one while it was taking off from Kuala Lumpur, the second as it was climbing towards Beijing.

The aircraft with 239 people on board disappeared from civilian radar at 1.30am as it crossed the Gulf of Thailand from Malaysia and Vietnam. Malaysian authorities have also stated that the plane was again caught on radar at 2.30am (this was later denied), and on military radar at 2.15am near the Malacca strait, indicating the plane had turned back from its flight path to Beijing.

Officials are still verifying whether the "blip" on the military radar at 2.30am was actually the MH370, Malaysia's defence and acting transport minister Hishammuddin Hussein reiterated on Thursday, and he refused to answer whether that blip had also dropped off the military radar.

"This is too sensitive information," Hussein told reporters. He added that Malaysia was in a "crisis situation" and was doing all it could to find the missing airliner. "There is no real precedent for a situation like this. The plane vanished," he said.

Malaysian and Vietnamese search teams spent Thursday morning and afternoon scouring waters off Vietnam's southern tip looking for debris photographed by Chinese satellite images. Nothing was found and the Malaysian transport minister said China had said the pictures were released online by accident. Chinese officials had also told him they would investigate how the images emerged.

The Chinese premier, Li Keqiang, speaking at his annual press conference on Thursday, reiterated that families and friends of more than 150 Chinese passengers on board the missing jet were "burning with anxiety".

He added that the Chinese government had asked Malaysian authorities to co-ordinate their activities and establish the cause of the disappearance. "As long as there is a glimmer of hope, we will not stop searching," he said.

Li added that as the country developed, more Chinese people would travel abroad, placing greater responsibility on the shoulders of the Chinese government.
With trust running low, the state broadcaster CCTV reported via Twitter that families had asked the Malaysian envoy whether the air force had shot down the plane – a suggestion Malaysia denied. It added that relatives prevented him from leaving the meeting. It is thought he spent several hours with them at the hotel in Beijing.
While anger has so far focused primarily on the Malaysian response, relatives have also lashed out at Chinese officials for not doing enough to help.

"I really want to see President Xi [Jinping] – I don't know right now what could possibly be more important than the lives of these 200 people," one young woman, who gave her family name as Wen, told Reuters as she fought back tears.

"I also want to ask Mrs Xi, if your husband, President Xi, was on the plane, just imagine, if it was you, how would your parents feel?
"My husband was on the plane. Every day my children are asking me about their dad. What am I supposed to do? … We're helpless. We need our government to support us."

In a commentary, China's state news agency Xinhua wrote: "Most of what we have heard from briefings, denials and refusals to comment by investigating teams has served to deepen the mystery."

It added that the countries whose nationals were missing had a right of access to the latest information to enhance the rescue operation.
"If terrorism was behind the disappearance, which can neither be determined nor ruled out currently, information sharing would be a must for the entire international community," it added.

It said authorities should "tell the truth even if it turns out to be cruel to families and friends of the passengers … Unless transparency is ensured, the huge international search operation can never be as fruitful as we hope and expect."
http://www.news-republic.com/Web/ArticleWeb.aspx?regionid=3&articleid=20251758

Rex

  • Mensagens: 1234
Os americanos devem saber alguma coisa que mais ninguém sabe.

Citação
The Pentagon has told to the Guardian that the US is moving the USS Kidd destroyer northwest through the Strait of Malacca.

A Pentagon spokesman said he could not confirm that the Pentagon was moving the USS Kidd to search the Indian Ocean but that it is searching the Strait of Malacca, the same area searched by a P-3C surveillance aircraft a few days ago.

The Malaysians requested that a ship come and search the same area the plane had already searched, the spokesman said.

An earlier ABC News report quoted an unnamed “senior Pentagon official” as saying “We have an indication the plane went down in the Indian Ocean.”

The Pentagon spokesman told the Guardian that he didn’t know “where ABC is getting that from.”

There have been many fruitless leads and red-herring turns so far in the search for MH370, a search that continues on many fronts across a total area of around around 35,800 square miles (92,600 square kilometers), “or about the size of Portugal,” as AP puts it.

A Navy P-3C Orion aircraft had been “searching over both the Strait of Malacca and the Gulf of Thailand,” according to an AP report. “The P-3C can search for extended periods and cover 1,000-1,500 square miles every hour. On-board sensors allow the crew to clearly detect small debris in the water.”
http://www.theguardian.com/world/blog/2014/mar/13/mh370-no-sign-of-debris-detected-by-chinese-satellite-live-updates

ClearedForTakeOff

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 1282
    • Aviation Blog
Os americanos devem saber alguma coisa que mais ninguém sabe.

Citação
The Pentagon has told to the Guardian that the US is moving the USS Kidd destroyer northwest through the Strait of Malacca.

A Pentagon spokesman said he could not confirm that the Pentagon was moving the USS Kidd to search the Indian Ocean but that it is searching the Strait of Malacca, the same area searched by a P-3C surveillance aircraft a few days ago.

The Malaysians requested that a ship come and search the same area the plane had already searched, the spokesman said.

An earlier ABC News report quoted an unnamed “senior Pentagon official” as saying “We have an indication the plane went down in the Indian Ocean.”

The Pentagon spokesman told the Guardian that he didn’t know “where ABC is getting that from.”

There have been many fruitless leads and red-herring turns so far in the search for MH370, a search that continues on many fronts across a total area of around around 35,800 square miles (92,600 square kilometers), “or about the size of Portugal,” as AP puts it.

A Navy P-3C Orion aircraft had been “searching over both the Strait of Malacca and the Gulf of Thailand,” according to an AP report. “The P-3C can search for extended periods and cover 1,000-1,500 square miles every hour. On-board sensors allow the crew to clearly detect small debris in the water.”
http://www.theguardian.com/world/blog/2014/mar/13/mh370-no-sign-of-debris-detected-by-chinese-satellite-live-updates

Será colisão com um UAV/Drone?

ruialves

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 739
Será colisão com um UAV/Drone?
TCAS precisa de um transponder do outro lado, certo?
--
Cmps,
Rui Alves


david1990

  • Mensagens: 786
  • Airbus A320 - Boeing 777 - Boeing 747
Os americanos devem saber alguma coisa que mais ninguém sabe.

Citação
The Pentagon has told to the Guardian that the US is moving the USS Kidd destroyer northwest through the Strait of Malacca.

A Pentagon spokesman said he could not confirm that the Pentagon was moving the USS Kidd to search the Indian Ocean but that it is searching the Strait of Malacca, the same area searched by a P-3C surveillance aircraft a few days ago.

The Malaysians requested that a ship come and search the same area the plane had already searched, the spokesman said.

An earlier ABC News report quoted an unnamed “senior Pentagon official” as saying “We have an indication the plane went down in the Indian Ocean.”

The Pentagon spokesman told the Guardian that he didn’t know “where ABC is getting that from.”

There have been many fruitless leads and red-herring turns so far in the search for MH370, a search that continues on many fronts across a total area of around around 35,800 square miles (92,600 square kilometers), “or about the size of Portugal,” as AP puts it.

A Navy P-3C Orion aircraft had been “searching over both the Strait of Malacca and the Gulf of Thailand,” according to an AP report. “The P-3C can search for extended periods and cover 1,000-1,500 square miles every hour. On-board sensors allow the crew to clearly detect small debris in the water.”
http://www.theguardian.com/world/blog/2014/mar/13/mh370-no-sign-of-debris-detected-by-chinese-satellite-live-updates
os americanos sabem sempre algo que ninguém sabe :)

ClearedForTakeOff

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 1282
    • Aviation Blog
Será colisão com um UAV/Drone?
TCAS precisa de um transponder do outro lado, certo?

Yep, mode-C pelo mínimo.

Rex

  • Mensagens: 1234
Será colisão com um UAV/Drone?

Um evento catastrófico, destruição do avião, seja qual for, a ter ocorrido no momento que se perderam comunicações, parece-me cada vez mais improvável, pois é a zona onde mais se procurou, e nem destroços, nem o sinal das caixas, e toda essa zona do golfo da Tailândia tem profundidades baixas.

Na conferência de imprensa de ontem o tipo da Malásia disse que enviaram os dados do radar militar primário para os EUA, talvez tenham descoberto algo mais consistente aí, ou tenham detectado algo em redes secretas de vigilância de que não se pode falar publicamente por não existirem oficialmente.

De qualquer forma tudo é negado a nível oficial. Mas o jornal WSJ e o repórter em questão, especialista em aviação, são muito credíveis, não costumam fazer jornalismo tablóide.
E o que acho curioso é que a Roll Royce nem negou a notícia do envio de uma mensagem a partir do sistema comunicações dos motores, nem negou o desmentido, pelo menos até agora.

A ver se todo este mistério acaba rapidamente. Recordo que o Adam Air 574 indonésio em 2007 demorou uma semana a ser encontrado, estes acontecimentos não são assim tão invulgares como a imprensa refere. A ver se é desta que a industria dá um passo em frente em implementar soluções para estes dramas, que devastam ainda mais as famílias das vítimas.

ClearedForTakeOff

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 1282
    • Aviation Blog
Será colisão com um UAV/Drone?

Um evento catastrófico, destruição do avião, seja qual for, a ter ocorrido no momento que se perderam comunicações, parece-me cada vez mais improvável, pois é a zona onde mais se procurou, e nem destroços, nem o sinal das caixas, e toda essa zona do golfo da Tailândia tem profundidades baixas.

Na conferência de imprensa de ontem o tipo da Malásia disse que enviaram os dados do radar militar primário para os EUA, talvez tenham descoberto algo mais consistente aí, ou tenham detectado algo em redes secretas de vigilância de que não se pode falar publicamente por não existirem oficialmente.

De qualquer forma tudo é negado a nível oficial. Mas o jornal WSJ e o repórter em questão, especialista em aviação, são muito credíveis, não costumam fazer jornalismo tablóide.
E o que acho curioso é que a Roll Royce nem negou a notícia do envio de uma mensagem a partir do sistema comunicações dos motores, nem negou o desmentido, pelo menos até agora.

A ver se todo este mistério acaba rapidamente. Recordo que o Adam Air 574 indonésio em 2007 demorou uma semana a ser encontrado, estes acontecimentos não são assim tão invulgares como a imprensa refere. A ver se é desta que a industria dá um passo em frente em implementar soluções para estes dramas, que devastam ainda mais as famílias das vítimas.
Será colisão com um UAV/Drone?

Um evento catastrófico, destruição do avião, seja qual for, a ter ocorrido no momento que se perderam comunicações, parece-me cada vez mais improvável, pois é a zona onde mais se procurou, e nem destroços, nem o sinal das caixas, e toda essa zona do golfo da Tailândia tem profundidades baixas.

Na conferência de imprensa de ontem o tipo da Malásia disse que enviaram os dados do radar militar primário para os EUA, talvez tenham descoberto algo mais consistente aí, ou tenham detectado algo em redes secretas de vigilância de que não se pode falar publicamente por não existirem oficialmente.

De qualquer forma tudo é negado a nível oficial. Mas o jornal WSJ e o repórter em questão, especialista em aviação, são muito credíveis, não costumam fazer jornalismo tablóide.
E o que acho curioso é que a Roll Royce nem negou a notícia do envio de uma mensagem a partir do sistema comunicações dos motores, nem negou o desmentido, pelo menos até agora.

A ver se todo este mistério acaba rapidamente. Recordo que o Adam Air 574 indonésio em 2007 demorou uma semana a ser encontrado, estes acontecimentos não são assim tão invulgares como a imprensa refere. A ver se é desta que a industria dá um passo em frente em implementar soluções para estes dramas, que devastam ainda mais as famílias das vítimas.

A RR não tem nada que se pronunciar até começar uma investigação. Possívelmente até estará legalmente impedida do o fazer, sem a autorização do cliente.
Grande parte das notícias do WSJ têm sido um lixo, típicamente a citar "fontes insiders" ou "gente que conhece".
Só se têm mostrado bem quando publicam desmentidos, esses sim oficiais.

ClearedForTakeOff

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 1282
    • Aviation Blog
Um exmplo do lixo jornalístico que por aí anda:

"O Wall Street Journal (WSJ) cita fontes "familiarizadas com a investigação""

Rex

  • Mensagens: 1234
A RR não tem nada que se pronunciar até começar uma investigação. Possívelmente até estará legalmente impedida do o fazer, sem a autorização do cliente.

Eu pessoalmente acredito nas autoridades da Malásia, e tem a ver com isso. Se mentissem relativamente a terem conhecimento duma msg dos motores e a escondessem do público, a RR não teria alternativa senão vir desmentir, pois estariam a colaborar numa aldrabice, e nenhum contrato obriga a isso.

Grande parte das notícias do WSJ têm sido um lixo, típicamente a citar "fontes insiders" ou "gente que conhece".
Só se têm mostrado bem quando publicam desmentidos, esses sim oficiais.

Talvez, sabemos como são os Media em geral. Mas o WSJ não é propriamente um tablóide de esquina, e num assunto global tão mediatizado como este, custa-me a crer que se arrisque demasiado em algo inventado que depois se pode virar fortemente contra a credibilidade deles. Enfim, é esperar por novos desenvolvimentos, está uma confusão dos diabos tudo isto.

Rex

  • Mensagens: 1234
Um sumário do Guardian dos últimos desenvolvimentos:

Citação
* The Malaysian authorities have indicated they are open minded to reports which cite US officials, suggesting the missing plane change course and headed west. The acting transport minister Hishammuddin Hussein confirmed that the search has extended into the Indian Ocean.

* Radar and satellite information from other countries, including the US, is now being shared with Malaysia. This is currently being “digested,” Hussein said.
Military radar-tracking evidence suggests the plane was deliberately flown across the Malay peninsula towards the Andaman Islands, according to Reuters. Its sources said the plane appeared to have flown between navigational waypoints west of Malaysia indicating it was being flown by someone with aviation training.

* Rolls-Royce has issued a statement denying that its engines sent out signals from the missing aircraft after it vanished from air traffic control screens. A team of experts from the UK, including staff from Rolls-Royce is due to arrive in Malaysia to help with the investigation.

* The Wall Street Journal claims the search is now focused hundreds of miles west from the plane’s original flight path based on “pings” picked up by satellite. The White House said that an unspecified “possible piece of information, or pieces of information, has led to the possibility that a new search area may be opened up over the Indian Ocean”.

* There has been no confirmed sighting of debris from MH370 almost a week after it disappeared with 239 passengers on board. The search operation now involves 57 ships, 48 aircraft, and 13 countries.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/14/mh370-search-for-missing-plane-extends-to-the-indian-ocean-live-updates

jopeg

  • Moderador
  • Mensagens: 1489
Caros,

In Presstur:
Citação

Pistas sobre o B777 da Malaysia levam às ilhas Andamã

Presstur 14-03-2014 (14h51)

A imprensa internacional, designadamente a agência Reuters e o “Wall Street Journal”, tem estado a divulgar informações que indicam que o Boeing B777 da Malaysia Airlines desaparecido faz hoje uma semana esteve a voar pelo menos por mais quatro horas do que se considerava o último contacto rumo às ilhas Andamã. A questão é que não se sabe o que aconteceu quando cessaram os registos a que se referem essas notícias.

Hoje ao fim da tarde (17h55 de Lisboa) faz uma semana que houve o último contacto do B777 que voava de Kuala Lumpur para Pequim com 239 pessoas a bordo, 12 deles tripulantes, tinha decorrido menos de uma hora desde que partira da capital da Malásia para um voo de aproximadamente seis horas.

Uma gigantesca operação de busca, envolvendo dezenas de aviões e de navios, foi então lançada incidindo sobre a região onde se dera o último contacto do voo MH370 e onde se presumia que por razões inexplicáveis se teria despenhado, mas nada foi encontrado.

Nos últimos dias, porém, começaram a surgir sucessivas informações de que esse último contacto não fora o fim do voo, pois radares militares teriam detectado o avião.

As informações mais recentes referem-se a dados de satélites, segundo os quais o avião continuou a voar durante centenas de quilómetros e seguindo corredores aéreos ‘institucionalizados’ para as ligações com o Médio Oriente e a Europa, o que leva à conclusão de que estava a ser pilotado por alguém que os conhecia.

Mas nada é avançado quanto ao mistério do que é que aconteceu ao avião e aos seus ocupantes, pois as fontes citadas nessas notícias não avançam informação mas interpretações e da parte das entidades oficiais há até resistência a confirmarem as novas informações.

A agência Reuters, citada pela imprensa internacional, diz que as fontes que lhe avançaram as informações sobre a continuidade do voo referiram que os dados apontam para que estivesse num rumo para as ilhas Andamã, onde, outras fontes, dizem não haver hipótese de aterrar um avião da dimensão do B777 sem ninguém dar por nada.

Uma dessas fontes comentou que as informações apontam para “sabotagem”, sem que se possa descartar a hipótese de “sequestro”.

Para essas hipóteses concorrem também as indicações de que o avião continuou a voar “invisível” para os sistemas de radar da aviação civil, o que é interpretado como resultado de uma acção deliberada de desligar os sistemas que regularmente emitem para terra a localização dos aparelhos.

As informações obtidas pela agência Reuters, de fontes que diz terem solicitado o anonimato, dizem que os radares militares mostram que um avião desconhecido que se presume ser o B777 da Malaysia, depois do último contacto com o controlo de tráfego aéreo, mudou de rumo para Oeste em direcção a um ponto designado por Vampi, no Nordeste da província indonésia de Aceh e que é uma das localizações usadas pelos pilotos que seguem o corredor N571 rumo ao Médio Oriente.

O aparelho seguiu então para o ponto designado Gival, a Sul da de Phuket, Tailândia, e foi seguidamente detectado que rumou para Noroeste em direcção ao ponto Igrex, no corredor que é usado paras as ligações com a Europa (P628), sobrevoando então as ilhas Andamã.


Jopeg

riceloi

  • Mensagens: 5
Agora dizem que o aviao andou sete horas.
Sete horas é muito tempo.

Resposta rápida

Com a resposta rápida pode escrever uma mensagem quando está a ver um tópico sem carregar uma nova página. Pode, ainda, usar o código BBC e os risonhos como usaria numa mensagem normal.

Nota: esta mensagem não irá aparecer até ter sido aprovada por um moderador.
Nome: Email:
Verificação:

 

Tópicos Relacionados

  Assunto / Iniciado por Respostas Última mensagem
175 Respostas
33649 Visualizações
Última mensagem 12 de Julho 2017, 10:13:23
por lockheed
4 Respostas
932 Visualizações
Última mensagem 08 de Setembro 2015, 18:33:00
por MarcoM
3 Respostas
1202 Visualizações
Última mensagem 26 de Fevereiro 2016, 15:56:21
por Spark
152 Respostas
18784 Visualizações
Última mensagem 15 de Dezembro 2016, 17:04:43
por LXwing
11 Respostas
1365 Visualizações
Última mensagem 08 de Agosto 2016, 14:15:50
por Larkhe

Total 105+-1=104 ms, db 0 ms, php 104 ms